Dog Walking – Meadows – 18th April

Oh! I’ve missed so much!

I’ve been at the London Book Fair this week, and then either racing the dogs round in the dark, or walking with lovely friends who stop me nature-gazing because we’re chattering too much. Ace for gossip, rubbish for my diary.

Utterly stuffed for time today, so Dora and I walked across Dave’s fields to the  Bottom Meadow. The wheat is just starting to come up through the heavy brown earth, and I can’t believe something so delicate can survive the ferocious squally wind. We pass a tiny velvet shrew on the path, and I want to stop to pick it up and take it to a hedge, but I don’t dare. It stands more chance of life with hawks around than it does if Dora were to notice it. I run on, just in case, and slip in the mud. Luckily no one around.

We reach the bridge between Dave’s fields, and someone’s broken the handrail. I wobble it, trying to figure out how it happened, and imagine a vastly wide rambler must’ve taken it out with their bum.

Over the next bridge, into Hamer’s Bottom Meadow, and a giant English Pointer bounds joyfully up to Dora and squashes her flat. Dora bristles but thankfully doesn’t snap. I’m blinded by my hood and the driving rain, but I just see Alison Carr being towed into sight by her golden Labrador puppy.

‘Bertie!’ she calls to the Pointer. Bertie rolls his eyes and rollocks off with Dora, both of them impervious to the rain and flirting like mad.

I realise Alison’s going the same way as me, but my brain’s stuffed with work, and I can’t think of a sensible line of conversation. Thankfully, she can, and we talk about dogs all the way back to the village.

We say goodbye, and I think how funny; despite sharing a dinner table, that’s the most we’ve ever spoken. I’m usually drunk and disorderly when I see her, once a year, at the village Progressive Dinner. I remember behaving dreadfully and eating lemon torte at her house once, and then Stevie and I wading through acres of gravel drive to get back to the pub. I had to wade back up it again the next morning to leave a thank you card, feeling like death. I kept thinking of Matthew Henry – He whose head is in Heaven, need to not fear to put his feet in the gravel.

I’m walking home as the sun breaks through, and suddenly the whole village is bathed in brilliant light and the sky is abruptly blue, as if the violent rain had never been. I put my hand to my hair to see if it’s wet, or if I just imagined it. Definitely wet, rats-tails style.

I’m just wondering how far down my cheeks my mascara may have run, when a handsome Daddy from the next village sweeps past in his Audi, blaring sports commentary. I’m too embarrassed and dishabille to wave, so I quickly study a budding willow, and pretend not to see him.

Oh vanity! This is why I have a reputation for being rude.

Walking, Wednesday 10th April

Neither Ellie nor I had left the house all day, and by four o’clock we fizzed with irritable energy, like wasps in coke cans.

We collected Dora and set out for Archie’s Covert, walking down the Banbury Road with its too-fast cars.

Ellie swung her dog coat by the arms and I snapped to stop it, or I’ll kill her.

‘I’d rather you didn’t,’ Ellie replied, continuing to swing.

‘Why!’ I shout. ‘Why are you still doing it?’

‘It’s boring. It’s a boring coat. I’m making it interesting.’

I laughed, leaving my bad temper on the cricket gate, next to a clump of brand-new daffs.

When we reached Jamie’s Mum’s Stables, we climbed the Hamers’ double gates to drop into their wheat field. The earth between the gates has turned to bright orange silt that sticks to our wellies.

‘What colour is the wheat?’ I said.

‘Green.’

‘Yes, but what sort of green?’

‘Green, green. With blue and shrivelly yellow bits.’

We inspected the wheat, the blades three inches long, if that. Usually by now (April), they’d be clumpy tussocky things, not sad and splayed like this in the sodden ground.

Ellie finds some cloven hoof tracks, and thinks they’re baby deer. I suspect muntjac. When we reach Archie’s covert, Dora vanishes down to the stream. I turn to look at our house across the valley, glinting with its new windows. Last summer’s mares’ tail lies in skeletal abandon around our feet. There are half-nibbled cones everywhere, snacked on by deer.

Ellie finds a giant poo, and we speculate that its from a monster stag. A massive red kite breaks free above our heads, and I’m frightened for a moment, imagining it might swoop down and carry off Dora.

‘Get a grip,’ said Ellie. ‘There’s millions of lambs over there. Wouldn’t you eat one of those before a stringy dog with claws?’

I looked at my daughter in surprise, and she burst out laughing.

‘Mummy,’ she says, as we turn for home. ‘Just look at your flowers. I’ll worry about everything else.’

Walking, Tuesday 9th April

Walking with friends is excellent, but very bad for observing nature.

Walked today with McNells, a gorgeous Horley Mummy with that sort of swishy  honey-blonde hair that makes a brunette feel grumpy. We have matching green Joules jackets (I copied), and kept imagining we looked like a couple of les-beans. McNells tried to hold my hand, and I shot into a hedge in horror.

We had B in a buggy, and we yattered all the way to the Scout Woods and back. I didn’t notice very much around me, except for an impression of exhausted brown-ness and the steepness of the hill once a buggy was involved.

Back in Horley, we were accosted by a lady in an Audi, driving behind a ginormous bump. She turned out to be McNellie’s new neighbour, 38 weeks pregnant and looking as healthy and happy as a Musto advert.

‘Pop round,’ she said. ‘Any time!’

I imagined she meant McNells more than me, and I backed away, looking for Dora. I grabbed her just before she legged it into the Nicholls’ immaculate garden for a sneaky crap.

We waved as the new neighbour drove up Clump, and I was distracted by the fat black buds of a nearby ash.

‘Oh, Spring,’ said McNells, as B woke up. ‘Everyone’s having babies.’

Except me, I thought, wandering home.

Thankfully.

Walking, Monday 9th April

 

Dora and I did not escape the house last night until 7:45, by which time, we were both going crackers.

It took me a good five minutes of head-down marching before I even noticed I was still in my slippers. I didn’t dare go home to change in case Stevie said, ‘Thank God you’re back. I’m off to Nick-The-Brick’s.’

It took another five minutes for my shoulders to drop from round my ears, and to let the beauty and peace of the evening seep down my spine.

The sky behind St Ethelreda’s was the first thing I noticed – that beautiful unearthly grey-blue just before dusk proper. There were faint streaks of rose and gold, and birds appeared against it, briefly, blackly.

We walked up Hornton Lane, admiring the tête a-tête narcissus that everyone seems to have planted this year. Their prim neatness seems to make daffodils look gawky and unsophisticated, like leggy school-girls in their first night club.

Snowdrops are mostly over, flinging off their shrivelled petals and waving tiny bare stamens. Nothing very demure about them now.

We turned up Clump Lane, me picking my slippered-way over puddles. Dora shot off, intent on finding squirrels to murder. The light was playing tricks on ordinary colours – the clay of Clump looking its most vibrant orange.

Coming to the top of the hill, I bumped into a Handsome Horley Husband, and immediately tried to hide my feet and bat my eyelashes at the same time. He looked a little surprised, but we had a lovely conversation about the satisfaction of digging veg beds.

I was distracted by the beautiful view over towards the Scout Woods, and left my mouth on auto-pilot, which is always a worry. I tried frantically to remember what we’d been talking about – Spring? Mother-in-laws?

I hoped I’d not said anything inappropriate about beds, veg or otherwise.

A brace of duck called down in the valley, and I realised it was almost dark. Stevie would be dancing with frustration, eager to escape a Small Girl Sleepover party and reach the manly sanctuary of Nick-The-Brick’s.

‘I must go,’ I said regretfully.

Dora refused to leave the badgery-smelling garden of Bramshill Farm. I was too embarrassed to go in and get her. I waved the Handsome Husband good-bye, and slid off on my slippers, praying that Dora would notice and have some sort of female loyalty.

She caught me up at the end of Clump Lane, panting with the joy of her run, mouth wide in Jack Russell grin.

I grinned back, fussing her silly head. We turned for home, my red slippers livid in the half-light.

Riding The Hairy Ginger

I love riding, even though I’m very unstylish, and my feet stick out from the stirrups like a duck’s.

Every now and then, one of my horsey-set friends will get pissed in the pub and say I must come out with them on a hack, or mess around with some jumps or something. Usually, I’m there, next morning, hat crammed on hung-over head, desperately trying to figure out a new horse before it recognises a hobby rider, and chucks me off.

This Saturday though, I was not hungover, and I was invited to ride out with Lucy, the yard manager for Prickett’s, in Horley. The owner, Caroline, is an Eventer, and they have hordes of impossibly shiny Eventers in the stables, as well as a few very glamorous livery horses (complete with glamorous owners).

I was HUGELY excited, and very nervous in case I goofed in such professional company.

I turned up at 9 o’clock sharp, and instantly realised I didn’t quite look right. My ancient navy jodders have more darns in them than a shark net, and my daughter’s hat (I couldn’t find mine) had long ago lost its silk.

‘Riding for the disabled, darling?’ said Lucy.

She popped a silk on my head as if hiding an ugly teapot.

Her telephone then rang (it rings constantly), and I was left to eye up my mount. Bucky, an ex-champion race horse.

He was very tall and thin, covered with orange fluff like an Orangutan.  I went into his loose box and made friends.

‘You can tack up?’ said Lucy, bowling past and leaving saddle and bridle.

‘No worries!’ I called. But I didn’t really get a chance to find out, as an indomitable lady with a busy air and sweet smile appeared. I stood there looking useless whilst she hauled on bits of Bucky’s kit.

‘What hole’s his flash band?’ she said. I dithered and she sent me a pitying look.

The next moment, Bucky was securely trussed, and the lady whisked out, off to meet her daughter from the London train.

‘Thanks,’ I called. Bucky tried to eat my anorak.

Just as we were leading the horses out, a voice called to see if she could ride with us.

‘We’ll be going slow,’ yelled back Lucy. ‘Carles is on Buckaroo.’

The voice laughed, and I quailed further when she came into view. Beautiful blonde, with an impossibly handsome bay. She very politely didn’t mention the two inches of hiking-sock sticking out between my boots and jodhpurs.

We mounted and started off, me frantically trying to remember hands-down, heels-down, arse-in-the-saddle mantra. The combination of extremely capable Lucy and extremely glamorous Belinda made me very shy. I barely spoke as we walked out of the village.

Bucky kept dropping his right shoulder because his poor old bones were stiff, and I kept lurching to the side and grabbing his lack of mane. Belinda’s Perry insisted on skedaddling sideways and Bucky eyed him with disparagement.

Gradually, I got used to Bucky’s uneven gait, and relaxed enough to enjoy myself. My favourite thing about riding through villages is to peer into all the gardens and see what everyone’s planting. I was gawping over one wall at emerging daffodils when a grumpy brunette revved past in a silver people-carrier. ‘Bloody horses, ‘ I lip-read.

We headed towards Wroxton, smartly trotting now, and Bucky had warmed up enough to keep pace with the other two. Belinda turned out to be not at all scary, and to be a Humanist Minister. Her and Lucy’s conversation was so interesting I totally forgot to steer, and Bucky kept diverting to open gateways, like an elderly motorist pulling over for a break.

We reached the Drift Road and turned around. Bucky immediately changed gear, and pulled like a train to the front, shaking his head if I tried to check him.

‘Race instinct,’ called Lucy, as we shot off up the verge. ‘He just wants to be in front.’

I manned up, and sat like a stone, pull-leave, pull-leave on his bit. He heaved a sigh and slowed.

Belinda was talking about her counselling practice now, and I kept hearing tantalising snatches of advice for one of Lucy’s friends.

All too soon we were back in Horley, turning up the drive for Sor Brooke Farm.

‘There’s Caroline,’ said Lucy, as we passed a blonde doing some very s-l-o-w fancy cantering in the school. But Bucky wasn’t keen on stopping. At least no one was down in the yard when I slid inelegantly off his back. I landed heavily and staggered when Bucky turned to rub his lovely face up and down my body. Grateful for his shambling kindness, I put my arms round his neck, kissing him thank you and covering myself in ginger fluff.

Happiness is found on the shoulders of champions.

On Dog Walking 6th April 2013

Decent Saturday dog walks are hard fought. Ordinarily, Saturdays to us are work days, with Stevie doing endless Go-Sees, and the daughters dancing, then off to little buddies’ houses, or little buddies coming here, and I have to feed them all, and generally present myself as A Good Mummy.

I did slide off though, today, at about five, with Dora. It feels like the first proper day of Spring, after the longest winter imaginable. Swathes of snow still lie incongruously beneath hedges, like sheets that flew off some giant’s washing line.

We walked the Bottom Meadows, Dora sending up pheasants from the stream. Their frantic Ee-full ee-full ee-full and ungainly, neck-stretched flight always make me think of fat ladies running for the loo. They also makes me think of shooting, and how I wimped out of my first game shoot.

Dora also sent up a brace of ducks, the mallard flashing green in the low sun. They both flew silently, and low, with none of the panic of the pheasants.

Along the first of Dave’s big fields, I stopped to examine the skeletons of giant cow-parsley type stuff, which I need to look the name up of. They are hollow and the children like snapping them down and using them as ineffectual weapons. They make a good swish sound when whizzed through the air.

Normally, I love walking with the children, but today I’m relishing just being with Dora. She doesn’t moan when I get fixated by an interesting piece of lichen. Nor does Dora stir up the brook so I can’t see the bottom and try to look for stickle-backs. I really want to see some stickle-backs in our stream, but I never have done.

I cross the stream into Emma’s meadow, and admire the new mole hills by the stream. Dora insists on weeing on every single one.

I’m supposed to be taking the children to Hornton for a sleep-over, so I up my pace to cross the meadow and swing round to the bottom of the village.

But then I bump into a Horley beauty, walking her gorgeous Labradoodle, Ted. We pause to speculate whether a funny little white-flowered plant by the brook is chick-weed, or something more exciting.

And then we’re catching up on gossip and eyeing up the sweet, strangely dressed Frenchman who walks briskly by.

Eventually, Dora and I wander on, totally forgetting about taking the children to Hornton, and I find a whole wall by Pete Miers’ cottage, frothing with green aubretia leaves, tiny scraps of violent and purple hinting at the show to come.

Dora decides to crap on a verge and I don’t have any bags left in my coat. Luckily, there’s a drain, so I flick it down with my welly boot.

We climb over into the cricket field, and the instant I see Jess flying down on her scooter I remember we’re horribly late. All the lovely peace of the walk is lost in the desperate scramble to pack pyjamas, and Rabbit and Lamby, and to stop everyone walking in the new puppy wee.

My first ever post! Really silly to be quite so excited…

I’m totally rubbish at diaries, so someone suggested I write a blog instead.

This blog therefore, will be about the things I like and do, which will be HUGELY boring, I expect, to other people.

The good thing is, though, the characters in my books will admire flowers at the right time of year, and wear the right clothes and do the right things at the right time.

So, my blog will contain the following:

Children

Dogs

Chickens

Writing

Dog walking

Horse

Pony

Husband

Wine/gin/Bacardi and lemonade

Skiing

Cricket

Shooting

House-building

Gardening

Cooking

Parties

Weather

Ribbons

Because they’re all the things I like.